A Second Wine Worth a Second Glass

Mad Wine
2000 Pagodes de Cos I recently opened a bottle of 2000 Pagodes de Cos, the scond wine of the famous Cos d'Estournel in the St. Estephe region of Bordeaux. In the 1855 Classification of Bordeaux, it was designated a Second Growth. Regardless of the controversy over the subjective aspects of classifying chateaus, and the accordant lobbying and politicking, Cos d'Estournel is one the finest wines in all of Bordeaux. But its price leaves it out of the reach of the majority of wine drinkers. My advice would be to seek out the less heralded vintages, which often are ready to drink much earlier and can be had at a much lower price. (Avoid 2000, 2005, and the stratospheric pricing of the mega-hyped 2009.) But if you, like me, just had to get your hands on a pedigreed Bordeaux from a highly regarded vintage, seek out the second wines of famous chateaus. The Pagodes de Cos comes from the same vineyards as the chateau's first wine, but is produced from the estate's younger vines. And the 2000 was a beauty. Medium-bodied and mature, it showed great secondary characteristics that only come out of a well-aged wine. Pure pleasure and elegance. If I had to quibble--and you know I will--I wished that it was a little more concentrated. I think that's where you really get the difference from the younger versus the older vines. A ton of wineries from all over the world offer second labels or "declassified" wines that allow you to experience the finest of vineyards and wine-making talent. Seek them out! I would love to hear of your favorite wine discoveries; know of some famous names and places at (relatively) reasonable prices? Let me know in the comments.

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2005 Saint-Estèphe: Heavenly Bordeaux

Mad Wine
2005 Bordeaux Not to throw salt on the wound, but if you missed out on our Bordeaux Extravaganza last night (8 reds, 1 white, 1 Sauternes) you should be kicking yourself. The stars of the show were two offerings from the much-hyped 2005 vintage; now I'm beginning to understand why everyone went nuts over it. The duo that stood out were the Calon Segur* and the Cos d'Estournel. Calon Segur has always been a favorite of mine; I've carried a torch for it ever since drinking a bottle of the 1999 with my coworker, Jeff. (Thanks, dude.) Impeccably balanced and elegance personified, the only thing that could keep me away from a bottle is knowing that it needs more time to develop. Buy now and tuck it away for five years. The Cos was remarkable for its concentration yet, for a wine with such depth, was not overwhelming on the finish. Hide a few bottles for another decade. (Coincidentally, I happen to know a place where you can store them.) And although this was all about the reds, the white and Sauternes that were bookends to the tasting were pretty extraordinary. The white was a 2000 Carbonneiux Blanc, which at 10 years was no shrinking violet. It had a nice richness and texture from the bottle age but retained a lot of freshness. Behold the power of the Semillon/Sauvignon Blanc blend! I think I need to dedicate a future World's Most Underrated Wines post wholly to White Bordeaux. The Sauternes, the 2006 Coutet, was a revelation. Golden deliciousness but with lively acidity on the finish; great sweetness but very nimble. I um, think I need to dedicate another World's Most Underrated Wines post to sweet wines in general. *Tayrn Miller may have said it better while live-tweeting from the tasting: http://twitter.com/tarynmiller/status/4745679645704192 So would you like to know about our next big tasting? Let me know in the comments! Follow Esquin on Twitter

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