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pFriem Family Brewers

The story of pilsner starts in 19th century Bohemia when a Bavarian monk smuggled a special yeast to a brewmaster in Pilsen. The world’s first blond lager, the original Pilsner Urquell, is still produced there today.

The story of pFriem Pilsner starts in the Pacific Northwest, Josh Pfriem a Seattle native who’s love of beer sent him bicycling around Belgium, concocting batches in a shed in his backyard, tracking down the best brewers around and needling them for information. He spent most of his early years divided between skiing and home brewing. His first real job was at the Utah Brewers Cooperative and he was hooked.

He worked at the legendary local Will Kemper’s Chuckanut Brewery before landing at Full Sail in Hood River, OR. While in Hood River he met his future partners, Ken Whiteman and Rudy Kellner and that lead to pFriem Family Brewers. They shared a deep love of family, the Columbia River Gorge and of course, great beer — but more importantly, each brought his own unique skill set to the table, creating the means and vision to not only make great beer, but to operate a great business. In August 2012, pFriem Family Brewers opened its doors for the first time, and the three founders realized the beginning of their unique dream.

Today, pFriem is on just about everyones Top list of great PNW Breweries. They stand apart in their crafting of world class Pilsner. Pilsner might be ubiquitous in the macro lane. But, it takes a deft hand and dedication to make great craft Pilsner. Josh Pfriem does just that.
pFriem Pilsner

“Aroma of fresh grass and flowers and a touch of honey. While there are no monks involved in this pilsner, there is still a crisp and spicy finish.”
ABV: 4.9%
IBUs: 38
Served at: 40 – 45° F
Hops: Perle, Saphir, Tettnang, Spalt Select
Malts: Gambrinus & Weyermann German Pilsner, Carafoam, Acidulated


Four Roses Esquin Single Barrel – OESK

Four Roses Esquin Single Barrel – OESK

ABV: 54.8%    Store: Esquin    

Age: 10 yrs 1 mo Barrel No:214

$89.99 until February 28th / reg $97.99 btl – save $8

We are beyond honored to have procured our very own barrel of Bourbon form one of Kentucky’s oldest distillery – Four Roses. We only have a dozen cases of this batch, unlike any other, and we want to share with you!

Esquin’s Four Roses Single Barrel OESK

Nose: Woody and spicy with nice notes of char, fruit and dark sweets.

Palate: Delicate, woody, fruity, fresh, creamy, caramel, vanilla, and toffee reminiscent of Fiddle Faddle.

Finish: Wood, spice, vanilla and grains that fade out sweetly

Overall: This is smack you in the face solid bourbon! Complex, Rich and Warm. Enjoy a glass of this any time.

What are we going to do with the empty barrel? Make some beer, of course, stay tuned for details…

A Beer-Themed Lunch

MusselsThe name of the place is Esquin Wine Merchants, but we do love (and sell) some good beer as well. I recently attended a beer-themed lunch (can’t tell you how much I enjoyed typing “beer-themed lunch”) at Quinn’s that recharged my passion for beer and, delightfully, introduced to some unexpectedly excellent beer and food pairings.

As a wine guy, my brain has been programmed to think Muscadet whenever mussels are involved. It’s not a bad thought–especially when Pepiere is involved–but I was really surprised by how well one of the beers paired with mussels. I figured it would be the lightest-style beer (the lager or the Hefeweisen) but the mussels turned out to be sensational with the Orval Trappist Ale.

Duck TerrineAnother great pairing was the Samuel Smith Organic Cider with the Duck Terrine. The sweetness and acidity of the cider was a nice counterpoint to the richness of the terrine; duck is a meat that really lends itself to having a fruit component added. In this case, in liquid form.

Veal BreastThis veal was served with a trio of beers (Samuel Smith Nut Brown Ale, their Oatmeal Stout, and the Ayinger Celebrator Bock) that were all complimentary with the dish. Definitely a heartier beer was in store for this very rich meat; I’d have to say the Stout and Bock were better by a hair.

Apricot TartFinally desert: an apricot and apple tart. It was served with the Lindemans Framboise, which I have to admit I find too sweet. But the tartness of the fruit seemed to tame the sweetness a bit and bring out the acidity of the Lindemans.

I left Quinn’s very full, and full of respect for how well beer can pair with great food. Am I giving up my Muscadet anytime soon? Um, no. Never! (In fact, I’ve got a bottle in my fridge right now.) But I was reminded that the world of beer has many of the qualities that make wine so compelling. There’s a rich history, full of great stories. And it’s delicious.

Full disclosure: Lunch was provided by the distributor and importer.


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